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Welcome to my website!  I proudly represent the 95th District in the Virginia House of Delegates (parts of Newport News and parts of Hampton).  I am honored to serve the residents and help make the Peninsula an even better place to live, learn, work, play, and raise a family.  Join the team today and together, we can continue to get the changes we need and deserve!

The 2022 General Assembly Legislative Session began on Wednesday, January 12, 2022 at noon and adjourned Sine Die on Saturday, March 12, 2022.  During Session, members of the Virginia House of Delegates met during the week and you can watch our committee meetings and Floor sessions here.  Can't remember how a bill becomes a law, no problem! Get your refresher here to follow along the process.

Here are links from our work in 2022 and 2021:  

During the Reconvened Session, we voted on the Governor's amendments and vetoes, including vetoes of bills that could have actually helped a lot of people.  We were also called back for a Special Session because we did not finish our work like we usually do.  During Special Session, we voted on conference reports (compromise bills), including the budget and the Governor's detrimental amendments to the compromise budget. We are scheduled to go back on September 7th.

In the meantime, be sure to sign up for our email newsletter to receive important updates. And be sure to check back often for news posts and updates from the District.  We have included important information on COVID-19, including rent and mortgage relief, COVID-19 testing and vaccination info, and more.  Take a look around the site and be sure to like, follow, share, and comment on my social media pages.

Thank you for visiting!

Sincerely,

Marcia "Cia" Price 

Member, Virginia House of Delegates

95th District: Parts of Newport News and Hampton

"Be the change. Do the work."

 

Redistricting Update: The 95th District was impacted by the 2022 Redistricting process and in future elections will become the 85th District. For more information, please visit VPAP Redistricting Info on House Districts

 A note about our Constituent Services: There have been some frustrations expressed with our requirement that you let us know if you are a resident of the 95th District. While I understand that concerns and issues often do not have the same borders as districts, my primary commitment is to the people I serve and then I will do as much as I can for others. Feel free to reach out to your own Delegate if you do not live in the 95th District. Here's a link to find out which Delegate has the honor of serving you: Who's My Legislator

updated 6/27/22

 

News

Thursday, July 21, 2022 4:23 PM

Youngkin’s pick for Historic Resources Board under fire for defending the Confederacy

Gov. Glenn Youngkin is facing calls to withdraw his recent appointee to the Historic Resources Board due to her recent comments defending the Confederacy and criticizing former President Abraham Lincoln’s role in the Civil War.  Youngkin announced last week he had appointed Ann McLean, a historian and the founder of a Christian school in Richmond, to serve on the Board of Historic Resources. Shortly after, she came under fire for previous remarks defending Confederate statues on a Richmond radio show. On Monday, she returned to the radio show and seemingly doubled down. 

“I think the appropriate reaction here is disgust,” Del. Cia Price, a Newport News Democrat and member of the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus, said Tuesday.


Friday, July 1, 2022 10:36 PM

Housing Update

Video Update on HB802 Veto and Implications - Help for SeaView Lofts residents - Ways to get involved


Thursday, June 30, 2022 11:27 PM

Channel 3 Update on SeaView Lofts Situation

 


Thursday, June 30, 2022 11:20 PM

13 News Now Update on SeaView Lofts Housing Crisis


Sunday, June 26, 2022 2:49 PM

Opinion: Congress should follow Virginia by protecting domestic workers

Domestic workers are excluded from American labor laws by design. Congress left out domestic workers from the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to appease white Southern lawmakers who wanted to maintain free and cheap labor, provided primarily by women of color. To this day, this country does not guarantee a minimum wage or overtime pay to these essential workers. To keep these Jim Crow laws on the books is to support racist policies and reinforce workplace oppression.

This work is personal. We come from families of care workers who did not have the protections they deserved. That’s why we’re pushing back against that painful and too-often ignored history. Last year, Care in Action worked with domestic workers and sponsors Del. Cia Price, Del. Wendy Gooditis, and state Sen. Jennifer McClellan to pass a Virginia Domestic Workers Bill of Rights. This historic legislation extends common workplace rights to house cleaners, health care aides and nannies. Virginia is the first state in the South to codify protections for these workers and finally turn the page on this ugly chapter from our past.

While passage of these laws is essential and long overdue, we can’t help but wonder: How long will it take for the rest of the country to catch up? Progress doesn’t have to be a painful, drawn-out process. Swift federal action can protect all workers across the nation.

 

(Click to read the full Op-Ed)


Friday, June 24, 2022 6:14 PM

Del. Price's Statement on SCOTUS Overturning Roe v. Wade

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   June 24, 2022

CONTACT  Tempestt Boone, 757.968.6054

NEWPORT NEWS, VA - Delegate Marcia "Cia" Price issued the following statement in reaction to the devastating Supreme Court decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization to overturn decades of precedent regarding a woman's right to make her own healthcare decisions. 

 

"There's no excuse. A tarnished court this flippant with both the law and lives has lost all credibility, and today's disastrous ruling only serves to undermine further the very protections they are duty-bound to uphold. And if that wasn't enough, the court signaled its next targets: contraception, consensual sex between adults, and marriage equality. All are on the chopping block, and it is clear that after today's ruling, we cannot and should not trust this failed institution to safeguard our rights.

"But as some of its most conservative members made clear, the game was rigged from the get-go. The court established for itself a single, myopic barometer. And when official decisions can only be influenced by the thinking prevalent when old, white, land-owning men had a singular say in public affairs, we are destined to regress as a nation and fall even further, with civil rights eroded and Black and Brown communities once again bearing the brunt of a system designed to crush those most in need. 

"The unfortunate reality is that all of this was accomplished under the false banner of "pro-life." But there is nothing "pro-life" about today's ruling. In fact, that term is rendered meaningless without programs, funding, and resources in place to support those lives. Many individuals self-applying that title are also the same folks who will vote against maternal health initiatives, public school funding, pre-K expansion, after-school programs, free lunch, childcare, and affordable housing without batting an eye. They are the same folks who were quick to yell “my body, my choice” about life-saving vaccinations during the pandemic but are so entrenched in their own power grabs, they do not acknowledge the depths of their hypocrisy.   

"I know today is tough, and honestly, it may get worse before it gets better. But we can not give up on this fight.  Thank you to the advocates, activists, volunteers, healthcare providers, lawyers and so many others who have been on the front lines of this fight. We see you, we appreciate you, and we stand with you. You can support their efforts by signing up to volunteer and donating to these organizations:

 

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Delegate Marcia S. “Cia” Price represents the 95th District of the Virginia House of Delegates, which includes parts of Newport News and Hampton.  In the House, she serves on the Health, Welfare, and Institutions Committee and the General Laws Committee.  She was the lead sponsor of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia and she has consistently sponsored the Reproductive Health Equity Act.


Friday, June 24, 2022 2:32 PM

State board calls health commissioner’s remarks about race, public health an ‘embarrassment’

If you're willing to ignore the causes of a problem, you'll willing to ignore the solutions to the problem. I had to speak up about the statements the Commissioner made - racism is real and it has real impacts on life and death decisions in healthcare. Following the science isn't being "divisive". You can't ignore facts just because they make others uncomfortable. Want to help end divisiveness? Treat the actual issues leading to health disparities to get to health equity!!

 


Wednesday, June 22, 2022 2:12 PM

Del. Price Receives Jack Brooks Leadership Award

For Immediate Release, June 22, 2022                                                                                                                                        Contact: Tempestt Boone, 757.968.6054

Del. Price Given Jack Brooks Leadership Award for The Voting Rights Act of Virginia

Price championed the historic legislation in 2021

NEWPORT NEWS, VA - Delegate Marcia “Cia” Price, who represents the 95th District in the Virginia House of Delegates, was recently given the Jack Brooks Leadership Award for her efforts to secure access to the ballot box by fighting to pass the Voting Rights Act of Virginia.

The first of its kind in the South, and in the face of threats to the nation’s democracy, the Voting Rights Act of Virginia codified essential voter protections, outlawed voter intimidation and discrimination, and addressed the ongoing attempts to silence the electoral voice of Virginia’s Black communities and communities of color.

"I am humbled to receive the Jack Brooks Leadership Award for championing the ground-breaking Voting Rights Act of Virginia. Modeled after the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965, this historic legislation addresses the very real and imminent efforts to undermine our democracy. Through this law, we provide essential protections against voter discrimination and reverse many of the wrongs Virginia's Black and Brown communities have endured as obstacles to voting. I worked alongside Sen. McClellan to safeguard this fundamental right; a right that ensures all other rights and which so many in my community still have painful memories of being denied. And even as we celebrate this win, we must remain committed to fighting ongoing voter suppression in all its forms,” said Delegate Price.

Jeb Brooks, Chairman of the Jack Brooks Foundation Board of Directors and son of the late Congressman Jack Brooks, added, “The Jack Brooks Foundation is thrilled to honor Delegate Marcia “Cia” Price with the Jack Brooks Award this year. Delegate Price’s leadership in passing the Virginia Voting Rights Act was truly extraordinary and deserving of the highest praise. Her actions represent a shining example for elected officials across the country who are committed to ensuring that all Americans have an opportunity to fully participate in the electoral process.”

To watch a recording of the program, please visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgGjvjWgjaQ

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Delegate Marcia S. “Cia” Price represents the 95th District of the Virginia House of Delegates, which includes parts of Newport News and Hampton.  In the House, she serves on the Health, Welfare, and Institutions Committee and the General Laws Committee.  She is the former Chair of the Voting Rights Subcommittee and Vice-Chair of the Privileges and Elections Committee.

About the Jack Brooks Leadership Award
The Jack Brooks Foundation, for the second year, recognized elected officials or organization leaders who are elevating the needs of voters ahead of partisan politics by working to make it easier for Americans to participate in The Voting Process. The awards were given on June 16, 2022, of this year along with a panel discussion with the Foundation and the award winners. 

About the Voting Rights Act of Virginia
This legislation was signed into law in 2021 and is the most comprehensive state-level voting rights act to date.  Virginia is also the first state that was under the 1965 federal preclearance mandate to have its own voting rights act.  It enacted protections on the local and state level against voter intimidation, discrimination, suppression, and misinformation. To read more about the law, visit bit.ly/2021VRAofVA

 

 


Monday, June 20, 2022 7:11 PM

Del. Price's Statement on the Governor's Budget Amendments

June 20, 2022

NEWPORT NEWS, VA - Friday, we gathered for a special session in Richmond to consider the Governor's budget amendments, and something became apparent right away: he just doesn't get it.

Just when we thought the Governor's legislative agenda couldn't have been worse for Virginia residents, his amendments doubled down on his "politics before people" agenda. I voted against the compromise budget as initially introduced, voicing concerns about investments aimed more at shutting down critics than serving Virginians and a lack of transparency.

In just a few weeks' time, the Governor took that imperfect budget and made it worse.

His proposed changes not only reflected bad policy, but they were also clearly targeted at attacking his critics; choices focused not on improving lives but on taking jabs at those who have voiced concern about his Administration's priorities.

Look no further than how communities of color were treated in the budget.

Money set aside to support Virginia's DREAMers was instead moved to fund HBCUs. This decision intentionally tries to place communities of color at odds with each other without helping either. And unfortunately, some fell for this move straight out of the Jim Crow playbook.

This was a totally unnecessary choice because, with historic revenues, we had enough to fund both.  It's a cynical move and just one more example of the vindictive thinking at the heart of these disastrous amendments.

The Governor clearly doesn't get it, but House Democrats do. That's why we stood up to protect life-saving reproductive healthcare the Governor tried to strip away. And that’s why we fought against the Governor’s hyperpartisan agenda so we could better fund our schools and protect our communities from gun violence.  

It's clear that the Governor is perfectly comfortable using the budget to legislate; embedding failed policies in state spending that he couldn't get passed through the General Assembly.

Why else delay criminal justice reforms? Why try to sneak in provisions to defund public schools for unvetted, private pet projects? Why seek to silence free speech by making it harder to protest? Why seek to put even more money in the pockets of oil industry executives instead of everyday Virginians?

I’ll tell you why. Because the name of the game here isn't to serve the people; it's to settle scores. It isn't to do right by the residents of Virginia, it's to do right by the hosts of Fox News. 

The people of the Commonwealth deserve a budget that reflects their values, and that's exactly what House Democrats were fighting for this whole session. And while we stood firm in those values, the politics let the people down as efforts to undermine public education succeeded. And the General Assembly broke a promise to 500 families with incarcerated loved ones who had been told they would be going home next month. 

We can’t continue to let politics win over helping people  We have so much more to do, and we have to stay ever ready for their next push to further harm those in need while increasing the wealth of those in power.

I refuse to be quiet. Let's keep making noise together.

###


Wednesday, June 1, 2022 3:13 PM

Del. Price's Statement on the Budget

Today, Delegate Marcia "Cia" Price released the following statement about the 2022 budget conference report:

"There is a lot in this budget conference report we Democrats fought for and accomplished on behalf of the people of Virginia. From tax relief for all to long-awaited raises for teachers, from much-needed investments in our schools to early childhood education and more, this conference report reflects how hard we fought against a unified opposition more interested in making headlines than making policy.

Let me be clear: my dissent is not based on the investments this budget makes, but instead with what it leaves out; with who it overlooks and who it leaves behind.

The conference report reflects the cynical opportunism from too many of my colleagues from across the aisle. You will no doubt hear from them about the investments contained within the report. What you won't hear is how Democrats fought tooth and nail to get many of those investments included. You will no doubt hear from them about these "common-sense," "bipartisan" measures. What you won't hear is how Republicans pushed for bare-minimum investments; not to improve lives, but to silence critics. And you won’t hear them talk about the secretive budget process, which lacked transparency and ignored public input. 

Even when it became apparent that the Commonwealth had historic funding available (far more than was expected when the budget was first introduced) Republicans still chose to cut critical funding for gun violence prevention and affordable housing. 

We had the opportunity to forge a path that others could follow. During this difficult and painful moment, we could have once again led the way on innovative approaches to combating gun violence and saving lives. And instead, we slashed funding. 

The uncomfortable truth is that the same funding you will hear Republicans tout doesn't actually address the problems facing Virginians or chip away at the long-standing issues that too many in leadership have refused to address. They're band-aids; minimal increases that look good as fundraising emails but don't impact futures or transform communities. We Democrats are proud to have fought for each and every dollar that will go to a Virginian in need. But it's not enough, and the other side knows it. That money is there to keep us quiet, not make things better, and I for one refuse to be quiet. 

For these reasons, I voted no on HB30. Instead, I vow to raise my voice in favor of a bold state budget that truly represents our values and adequately meets the needs of our residents."


Saturday, April 30, 2022 6:35 PM

Opinion: Ways to address gun violence in Virginia communities (McClellan & Price)

These statistics are jarring. But these are not just statistics; each number represents a personal tragedy: mothers, fathers, sons and daughters whose lives were cut short due to gun violence. These are the communities where we live, work and send our kids to school. We cannot allow our homes to become places where we fear for our lives.

 

It’s past time for statewide action. Senate Bill 487 and House Bill 825, which we introduced this year, would be a major step in the right direction. Our bills present a common-sense way to alleviate some of the disasters brought on by gun violence by establishing a Center for Firearm Violence Intervention and Prevention at the Department of Criminal Justice Service (DCJS). 

(Click to read full Op-Ed)

 
 


Friday, April 29, 2022 4:00 PM

Berkley Court residents in Franklin have a right to get hot water back, housing lawyer says

"No one should be sitting there that long without hot water and being made to live in those conditions. That's something that needs to be fixed," Allman said. Currently, if someone complains to their local government about a property, they can come and inspect it. If they find code violations, they can issue fines or even condemn buildings, but often times Price says it's cheaper for landlords to pay a fine instead of fixing the problem.

"Let's say for instance you have this situation where the cost of repairs is $3,000, but the fine is $100. If you only have $100, your landlord is going to pay the fine and it doesn't incentivize you to fix the issue," Price said. State lawmakers passed the bill that would've added teeth to what local governments could do, but Gov. Youngkin vetoed the bill, saying it wasn't necessary.


Thursday, April 28, 2022 4:25 PM

Republican lawmakers abandon support for bills from Dems after Youngkin vetoes

Republican legislators bailed in their support of bipartisan legislation and instead voted this week to uphold Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s vetoes on 26 bills that had been introduced by Democrats. Three bills from delegates in Hampton Roads were among those vetoed. One was a measure from Portsmouth Democrat Nadarius Clark that would have set a three-year statute of limitations on medical debt. Two others came from Newport News Democrat Cia Price, including one that would have given localities the authority to sue negligent landlords over matters that endanger tenants’ health.

In a statement to The Virginian-Pilot, Price said she would not be discouraged. “I’m disappointed but undaunted,” she wrote on Thursday. “We have to keep fighting for the working families that need us the most.” In a heated speech Wednesday from the House floor, Price questioned why the governor vetoed a bill that received wide support. The measure was endorsed by the city of Newport News, Virginia Poverty Law Center and the Virginia Apartment and Management Association, which represents more than 230,000 rental units across the state. “We worked diligently with stakeholders that are often on opposite sides of housing issues,” she told fellow lawmakers. “We had support from those that were advocating for landlords and for tenants, and we had votes from both Republicans and Democrats.”

The governor’s veto, Price said, chose “rats, mice, roaches, leaky roofs, mold, mildew, broken doors and dangerous playground equipment over kids’ ability to be safe in their homes.”


Wednesday, April 27, 2022 6:24 PM

Virginia lawmakers fail to override any of Gov. Youngkin's vetoes

Some of the bills saw wide majorities when passed during the regular session, but failed to get enough support on Wednesday. A bill by Del. Marcia Price (D-Newport News) sought to give tenants more rights in dealing with landlords. "A lot of people back at home were shocked by this veto," Price said during a passionate speech. The bill passed 59-41 during the regular session, but failed along party lines Wednesday. "This veto chooses rats, mice, roaches, mold ... over [parents'] kids' ability to be safe in their homes," Price said.


Monday, April 25, 2022 6:00 PM

Letters for April 26: If the governor wants to make Virginia great, address slumlords

Support Virginians

Re “Housing bill could empower localities to take action against negligent landlords: ‘You shouldn’t treat somebody like this’” (April 10) and “Democrats ‘stunned’ as Youngkin vetoes 25 bipartisan bills — including 3 from Hampton Roads lawmakers” (April 12) and “Dogs bring officials together” (Our Views, April 13): Does the governor really think more about dogs than people? Two recent articles and an editorial imply that he does.

The first article was about a bill that was passed by the House and was awaiting the governor’s signature. He didn’t sign it. It would have given local authorities power to sue negligent landlords who don’t maintain their properties. The disguising conditions described by a tenant of a Newport News apartment were a sample of conditions targeted by the bill that had support of many groups, including the city of Newport News and the Virginia Apartment Management Association.

In the second article about Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s veto, Youngkin said in a statement, “My goal as governor is to make Virginia the best place to live, work, and raise a family and the bills I vetoed today reaffirm that commitment.”

The editorial was about Youngkin signing a bill to protect dogs. The Editorial Board stated, “it is reassuring whenever lawmakers recognize an egregious problem and move swiftly, together, to address it thoughtfully.”

The tenant who shared her story said it best, “I’m trying to be a voice for everybody who may be scared to say stuff. ... You shouldn’t treat somebody like this.” State leaders should be given a second chance. Del. Cia Price could reintroduce her bill, have the House pass it, and have the governor sign it reaffirming his commitment by correcting his egregious error.

Bob Volpe, Norfolk


Thursday, April 21, 2022 1:22 PM

Why Glenn Youngkin’s rough start in Virginia matters

When Virginia legislators passed a bipartisan measure to rein in negligent landlords, proponents were delighted. After too many horror stories about slumlords, policymakers in the commonwealth came up with a solution that was backed by both the Virginia Poverty Law Center and the Virginia Apartment and Management Association. By all appearances, it was a reform package that would benefit many Virginians. Even 16 Republican lawmakers in Richmond voted with Democrats to advance the legislation. But as the local NPR affiliate reported, the bill was nevertheless vetoed by Republican Gov. Glenn Youngkin. The report quoted Democratic Del. Cia Price saying, “I don’t know what the governor was thinking.”

That’s been a fairly common sentiment lately.


Wednesday, April 20, 2022 5:40 PM

Sen. McClellan, Del. Price Joint Statement on Recent Gun Violence and Pending Legislative Action

Price, McClellan Leading Bill to Create Firearm Violence Prevention Center

 Today, Del. Marcia Price (D-Newport News) and Sen. Jennifer McClellan (D-Richmond) released the following joint statement, following the recent outbreak of gun violence in Richmond and Hampton Roads. In Hampton Roads, 161 people were shot in the first three months of 2022, a 27% increase over 2021. In the city of Richmond, gun deaths are up 20% over last year.Price and McClellan urged the general assembly to fund the Firearm Violence Prevention Center in the 2022 budget. McClellan and Price patron’d legislation this session (SB 487 and HB825) to establish the Center for Firearm Violence Intervention and Prevention at the Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) to work across public safety and public health sectors to collect data and publish reports on violence caused by firearms, including suicide. The bill would also establish a fund to be administered by the Center to support community-based programs to prevent firearm violence. 


Wednesday, April 20, 2022 10:00 AM

Del. Price & Sen. McClellan Issue Joint Statement on Gun Violence Prevention

For Immediate Release: April 20, 2022

Offices of Senator Jennifer McClellan and Delegate Marcia Price 

Contact: District09@senate.virginia.gov & Tboone@house.virginia.gov

Del. Marcia "Cia" Price and Sen. Jennifer McClellan Release Joint Statement on the need to Fund Gun Violence Prevention

Richmond- Today, Del. Marcia "Cia" Price and Sen. Jennifer McClellan released the following joint statement, urging the General Assembly to fully fund the Firearm Violence Prevention Center in the 2022 budget:
 
"Too many families across Virginia know the very real toll that gun violence can have on the social, psychological, cultural, and economic health of a community."
 
This epidemic impacts how students learn, how residents live, how businesses invest, and how communities view themselves. And we owe it to these communities, who are disproportionately impacted by gun violence, to hear their voices and take action. That's why, during the regular session earlier this year, we introduced legislation aimed at addressing gun violence by establishing Virginia's first Firearm Violence Prevention Center (SB 487/HB 825).
(click for full statement


Tuesday, April 19, 2022 2:48 PM

Youngkin vetoes bipartisan bill designed to rein in slumlords

The horror stories have cropped up from tenants across the state: no heat, holes in the walls, rotten floors and flooded kitchens. In cases ranging from Glenwood Farms in Henrico to Aqua Vista in Newport News, residents’ complaints have continued even after property owners have been slapped with hundreds of code citations.

Housing advocates say legislation passed by the General Assembly on a bipartisan vote would have helped rein in the most negligent landlords. Now they’re questioning Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s veto of the bill from Del. Cia Price (D-Newport News), which received no critical testimony in committee and was backed by both the Virginia Poverty Law Center and the Virginia Apartment and Management Association.

“This is creating a safe space in Virginia for slumlords,” Price says. “I don't know what the governor was thinking but that's what the end result will be.”

Part of the problem now is that cities and counties don’t have great tools at their disposal to deal with absentee landlords, according to Christie Marra, director of housing advocacy at the VPLC. Their main mode of enforcement is citing landlords for code violations, which, if they don’t address, can result in fines as low as $50.


Monday, April 18, 2022 9:52 AM

Without federal voting protections, many look to states as the ‘laboratories of democracy’

As two Black women born and raised in the South, Price and McClellan share similar family histories of voter discrimination, and they joined a host of women of color to create and shepherd what is arguably the most comprehensive voting legislation standing in the country today—all in the former capital of the Confederacy and heartland of Jim Crow. The significance of getting this sweeping legislation passed was not lost on either of them as waves of voter suppression bills were making their way into statehouses across the country, ushering in what many have dubbed “Jim Crow 2.0.” And as the U.S. undergoes the first redistricting cycle in decades without the protections of the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965 and multiple state legislatures put forward maps intentionally gerrymandered to strip communities of color of their electoral power, the need for legislative intervention has never been more clear. 


Friday, April 15, 2022 1:23 PM

Governor’s vetoes likely to stand, when lawmakers return to Richmond

Democrats, who complained that many of the Governor’s vetoes were politically motivated, are encouraging lawmakers to affirm legislation that had broad bipartisan support. “Six of the ten House bills that were vetoed actually had the support of over two-thirds of the House of Delegates,” said Del. Eileen Filler-Corn (D-Fairfax). “And in fact, two of them, two of those bills passed unanimously.” But one of the lawmakers who introduced legislation the governor vetoed, Del. Cia Price (D-Newport News), said she’s not optimistic Republicans will go against the Governor.

“I’m not hopeful,” Price said during a news conference Thursday, “because this entire session we’ve seen the Republican House and the Republican Senators line up behind the governor, even when they were disagreeing with him behind closed doors.”

Republicans defended the governor’s actions and dismissed the Democrats’ complaints.

 


Thursday, April 14, 2022 11:05 AM

Price's Remarks on Gov's Vetoes for House Democratic Caucus Press Conference

Today, I stood with my Democratic colleagues in the House of Delegates to speak out against the Governor's vetoes of bills that passed the House and the Senate with bi-partisan support.  I joined our Leader, Del. Filler-Corn, Del. Clark, and Del. Hope who all had bills vetoed or soft-vetoed like me.  Here are my remarks:

I introduced HB 802 in direct response to unconscionable living conditions that some of the constituents of the 95th District were being forced to live in because of slumlords. And as I began to talk with other legislators, it was clear this was happening all around the Commonwealth.  These residents were paying their rent but were not able to get their concerns met or their work orders fulfilled.  

(Click for full remarks)


Thursday, April 14, 2022 5:00 AM

One gubernatorial veto would've helped localities address issues with slumlords

Governor Glenn Youngkin has vetoed 26 bills lawmakers put on his desk this year. One of those vetoes was for a bill aimed at cracking down on slumlords.  Mold. Rats. Bad plumbing. Sewage. Christie Marra at the Virginia Poverty Law Center says she's heard from renters across Virginia who have raised concerns about all of these problems and more. She says local governments have limited authority to crack down on slumlords, essentially charging them with a small fine and that's about it. That's why she was working with lawmakers on a bill to give local governments enforcement authority to fix problems. "And that requires the landlord to come into court and explain why he didn't do it," Marra says. "And if he doesn't have a good reason for not doing it he can be held in civil contempt of court and that can send him to jail."

The bill was introduced by Delegate Cia Price, a Democrat from Newport News. She was able to get the bill out of the House and Senate with bipartisan majorities. But the governor vetoed her bill this week. Price says lawmakers have the power to override that veto.  "Between now and veto session, every resident of Virginia has the right and I think responsibility to reach out to their legislator to tell them what it is they would want to see done," Price says. "And I really think that people understand slumlords and shady contracts should not have a harbor within Virginia."


Wednesday, April 13, 2022 12:07 PM

Price Statement on Governor's Vetoes

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 13, 2022

Contact: Tempestt Boone tboone@house.virginia.gov 757-968-6054

Delegate Marcia "Cia" Price Releases Statement Regarding Governor's Veto of HB 802, HB 1298

Today, Del. Marcia "Cia" Price released the following statement regarding the Governor's veto of HB 802 and HB 1298:

"It is both unfortunate and revealing that the Governor chose to veto good bills from the recent General Assembly Session, including two bills I championed. Both bills addressed issues raised by constituents of the 95th District, and both had very specific aims: to protect everyday people from exploitation.

HB 802 focused on renters and HB 1298 focused on high school student athletes, but the Governor's vetoes amount to the same thing: fewer protections for Virginians in need and more opportunities for the powerful to take advantage of those who are asking for help. These bills weren't partisan solutions; they are common-sense solutions, and I had hoped the positive impact they would have had on real Virginians would have overcome short-sighted politics.

Today, I am even more energized to fight for change. I will continue to work to protect and help the residents of the 95th District who I am ao honored to represent."


Tuesday, April 12, 2022 5:01 PM

Democrats ‘stunned’ as Youngkin vetoes 25 bipartisan bills — including 3 from Hampton Roads lawmakers

Three of the rejected bills were from legislators in Hampton Roads, including a housing bill from Newport News Democrat Cia Price that would have given localities the authority to sue negligent landlords over matters that endanger tenants’ health. In Youngkin’s explanation, he wrote that the bill included “unnecessary and duplicative provisions” that were already established under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code. Price said she was confused by his explanation, as judges and lawyers she’s spoken to say that isn’t the case. “I’m trying to get to the bottom of that,” she said. Noting that she’s been outspoken on civil rights issues, Price said it was “very possible” the governor targeted her bill. But she said she couldn’t be sure. “I’m not in the position where I would have benefited from this, I am in the position where I represent a ton of people who could have,” she said. “So (he) still didn’t succeed, if it was a personal attack.”


Sunday, April 10, 2022 11:26 AM

Housing bill could empower localities to take action against negligent landlords: ‘You shouldn’t treat somebody like this’

Del. Cia Price, who introduced the bill, said she worked on the measure after hearing from constituents who couldn’t get landlords to fix a range of problems, including mold, leaks, rodent infestations and broken heat or air conditioning.

 “It’s really heart-breaking because when I would go into their apartments and meet with them — a lot of the kids who live in these apartments have respiratory issues,” she said. “... I’m not sure if it was caused by their environment, but it’s definitely exacerbated by their environment.”

But the Newport News Democrat said localities have limited options when it comes to taking action against landlords; they can either issue fines or condemn the buildings.

Fines aren’t always effective because they can often be less costly than large-scale improvements, Price said. And condemning buildings can exacerbate problems with housing shortages or homelessness.

“This bill would allow them to sue to get the actual things fixed, not just give a fine or condemn the apartment,” she said.


Tuesday, April 5, 2022 5:44 PM

With gun violence on the rise in Virginia, lawmakers introduce 2 bills addressing the issue

Del. Cia Price is all too familiar with the cost of gun violence. The Newport News Democrat said she receives a steady stream of letters and visits from constituents whose loves ones died from gun-related injuries. 'There are certain visuals I will never be able to get out of my head — mothers and fathers weeping at having lost their children,” she said. “... It’s sad, it’s scary and we need long-term sustainable change.” Communities throughout Virginia are grappling with rising gun violence. And Hampton Roads is in the thick of it; local leaders met up last week to discuss potential solutions after 16 people were shot, four fatally, during an especially violent weekend in March.

But state legislators, too, are looking at ways to reduce gun violence. Two bills addressing the issue, one in the Senate and the other in the House, are under negotiation in a conference committee.

“It’s completely rocking certain communities across the commonwealth,” Price said. “... You have to wonder where we could be today if for the last three decades we had taken this seriously. My heart hurts about that, but I’m ready to do something so that 30 years from now we are not in that same position.”


Wednesday, March 30, 2022 11:23 AM

Slumlords beware: Virginia may give localities new power to go after poor housing conditions

Under Price’s proposal, localities will be allowed to step in on behalf of tenants to seek an injunction against a landlord with proven building code violations and ask for damages. Once the court is involved, judges can order landlords to make necessary fixes, repay tenants for repairs they undertake themselves or waive a portion of their monthly rent as compensation for the hazardous conditions.

The bill is only designed to hold landlords accountable for safety and health standards, so apartment managers who don’t keep the gym equipment, pool, or other amenities up to their tenants’ liking are exempt. The narrowly tailored nature of the bill is partly what earned HB802 the backing of the Virginia Apartment and Management Association and the Apartment & Office Building Association of Metropolitan Washington.

 

(;click for full artilce)


Thursday, February 17, 2022 12:12 PM

Crossover Newsletter: What is Crossover?

Read our latest email newsletter as I explain what Crossover is, invite you to an upcoming event with the Newport News Delegation, and offer more opportunities to get rent and mortgage relief.  You can click to read and subscribe to our upcoming editions.


Wednesday, February 16, 2022 8:22 PM

Youngkin signs bill making masks optional for schools by March 1

Although the bill passed with bipartisan support, many Democrats still strongly oppose the measure. Del. Marcia Price, a Democrat who represents Newport News and Hampton, calls this bill an overstep of state power.

“Taking the decisions out of the hands of those that were elected at the local level to make those decisions, I think is an overreach of our power,” said Price. “I just really hope that they got their calculations right that this will not be putting actual lives at risk but my fear is that it is.”

Sen. Lionell Spruill (D-Chesapeake) agrees.

“What happened was now you can let politics take the place of the school board,” said Spruill. “That’s a dangerous thing to do. I’m real surprised that they would do that. Doesn’t matter which party. We have an elected school board. They know their region. They know their areas.”


Friday, February 11, 2022 10:32 PM

Virginia House of Delegates Passes Seven Elections Reform Bills

He said, “The states that have less early voting have actually seen a higher increase in voter participation than the eight states that have longer early voting than Virginia.”

Delegate Marcia “Cia” Price (D-Newport News) replied, “As was mentioned, we had 45 days of early voting, and historic turnout in Virginia. I don’t think we have to go to other states to see that it was already working. What we have put into place since 2020 led to a historic turnout.”

She addressed the other bills. “It’s really interesting to me that there is no problem. This is a problem that is being pointed to that there could be this, there could be that, but it didn’t happen. But we’re coming with bills that would restrict voters from the access to the ballot, because we’re coming up with hypotheticals that aren’t even happening in the other states that we’re pointing to.”


Wednesday, February 9, 2022 9:52 PM

Del. Price on MSNBC

Today I was on MSNBC's Deadline:White House with Dr. Jason Johnson, Dr. Christina Greer with The Griot, and Attorney Elie Mystal with The Nation. We talked about Voting Rights and what's happening in Virginia with the bills that seek to undermine our democracy and roll back the progress we've made on how easy it was to vote in 2021, even with historic turnout. I'm going to let that be the topic of my evening update for today because our right to vote intersects with all other issues. 


Wednesday, February 9, 2022 6:41 PM

Republican bills to roll back voting access head for final House vote

Currently, Virginians have lots of options to prove their identity, including showing a utility bill. If someone can’t show any of those forms, they can sign an affidavit instead swearing they are who they say they are. Violators risk criminal punishment.

“If you show me that people abuse the opportunities that are available, then lets address it. There is no such abuse,” Delegate Marcia Price (D-Newport News) said in response to various proposals before the House. “These efforts have been shown to impact certain groups and certain populations and that’s just not fair. That is discrimination.”



Monday, January 31, 2022 6:30 PM

House panel backs $1.2 billion tax rebate; kills separate relief for low-income families

There was no Republican support for Price’s proposal to make 15% of the earned income tax credit refundable, even though she estimated the number of people in each delegate’s district who would benefit from it, including about 7,400 in Robinson’s district in Chesterfield. 

“We’ve seen how these direct payments can really help low-income families,” said Emily Griffey, policy director at Voices for Virginia’s Children. Price said the distinction by income is relevant to the broader effort to provide tax relief to all Virginians. “We’re hearing that word ‘all’ a lot,” she said. “I would just say that equality and equity are very different in these proposals.”


Tuesday, January 18, 2022 4:04 PM

Point of Personal Privilege: Words Matter

Today, I asked questions for clarification on the words some are using because words matter. And so do voting rights. (January 18, 2022)


Monday, January 17, 2022 5:31 PM

Community donates meals to Virginia Peninsula Food Bank

Monday's collection is the second largest the Virginia Peninsula Food Bank has had all year, helping them feed more than 10,000 people and children annually. The food bank tells us that a total of $13,401 and 11,209 pounds of food was generously donated Monday, which equates to 62,944 meals.


Sunday, January 16, 2022 10:50 PM

Newport News Mayor Price to host annual food drive in honor of MLK day

To celebrate and honor the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., Newport News is holding an annual food drive. Newport News Mayor McKinley Price is hosting an annual 'Day of Service' food drive on Monday, MLK Day. The community is invited to drop off food donations at the Virginia Peninsula Foodbank, located at 2401 Aluminum Avenue in Hampton. Donations can be dropped off from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.

Mayor Price will be joined by federal, state, and local leaders, including Congressman Bobby Scott, Delegate Marcia Price, Newport News Sheriff Gabe Morgan, and Newport News Police Chief Steve Drew. According to officials, while the need for food donations has grown, the Foodbank has struggled with a decline in donations. Currently, the Virginia Peninsula Foodbank is experiencing an 18% decrease in food donations.


Friday, December 31, 2021 11:33 PM

Thank you 2021! Hello 2022!

2021 brought its own challenges but thank you to those who helped make some pretty great memories! Here's to the potential that 2022 holds! Happy New Year! 🥳


Friday, December 17, 2021 5:29 PM

Newport News woman with lupus wants to raise awareness through specialty license plates

"These plates would bring awareness. Just imagine driving down the road and you see somebody else with the lupus awareness or fibromyalgia awareness plate, and you're a survivor yourself. You may think, 'I'm not alone, there are other people out there,'" Corbett said. Now, Corbett is fighting for this awareness campaign to move to the General Assembly next session, with the help of Del. Marcia Price representing the 95th district.


Thursday, December 2, 2021 6:01 AM

Banned from jobs: People released from prison fight laws that keep punishing them

In Virginia, the barrier crime law started two decades ago when legislators unanimously agreed to require background checks for some jobs involving kids. “It started out with a good idea,” said state Sen. John Edwards, a Democrat from Roanoke who voted for the bill in 1999. “Then it kind of evolved into this monster that we have now that’s overly broad without any way of getting relief.” 

Last year, after Democrats took over the state Legislature and the governor’s office, legislators created a subcommittee to study the issue, led by Edwards and Del. Marcia Price.  “We found that there is really no proof that we needed these barrier crimes,” Price said. “There was no proof they were keeping people safe, and it was actually doing damage.” 

In January, legislators are scheduled to consider a measure that could soften the law and create a waiver system. If it passes, it could give Carey the chance to go back to the work he does best.  “I don’t really care if it happens for me or not,” he said. “I just want it to happen for everyone behind me.”

(click to read full story)


Tuesday, November 23, 2021 10:56 AM

Newport News lupus survivor wants to bring awareness to two invisible illnesses with specialty license plates

In 2018, she founded the nonprofit organization, Social Butterflies Foundation. Its name stems from the butterfly-shaped rash that’s often a telltale sign of lupus. The organization provides a variety of resources including a support network, direct emergency assistance to survivors and their families, a college scholarship, and a wig outreach program.

Now, Corbett is fighting for the initiative that she said Del. Marcia Price, representing the 95th District, has stepped in to sponsor.

In order for the awareness campaign to move to the General Assembly next session, 450 preorders for each license plate must be obtained by Dec. 31.

If approved and signed by the governor, the plates will be made available for sale to the public. Corbett said a portion of each plate order will then go to Social Butterflies Foundation to further its mission and help more people throughout Virginia.


Sunday, November 7, 2021 4:47 PM

Opinion: Lawmakers to focus on repairing state mental health system

I’m proud to have a role in meaningful steps taken by the General Assembly to expand health care access, protect voting rights, strengthen housing protections, and invest in communities and schools. Even with that progress, there is much work ahead. As we look to the 2022 legislative session and confront a behavioral health system in crisis, investments to improve it must be a top priority. (click for full op-ed)


Wednesday, November 3, 2021 7:44 AM

Black voters in Virginia refuse to be blamed for a major Democratic defeat.

Democrats across Virginia expressed profound disappointment on Wednesday after Republicans romped to an unlikely victory in the governor’s race, an ominous sign for the Democratic Party ahead of next year’s midterm elections.

But one group refused to be blamed for the party’s poor showing: Black voters and elected officials.

Fears about Black turnout and a lack of enthusiasm did not materialize in Tuesday’s results, as former Gov. Terry McAuliffe, a Democrat, ran close to expected totals in the state’s majority-Black areas. Instead, Black state leaders and voters who backed Mr. McAuliffe said the results were a sign that the party could not rely on minority voters to cover its cratering totals in more white areas of the state, particularly in rural communities that voted heavily for Glenn Youngkin, the Republican businessman who won the governor’s race.

“I believe that Black voters are easily the first target for when things don’t go for how they want it to go,” said Marcia Price, a member of the Virginia House of Delegates who won re-election. “It’s a trash take to look at us and not the middle,” she said. “The middle said Youngkin is more palatable than Trump and they were willing to take a chance with him.” Ms. Price’s words reflect a sense among the state’s Black political class that communities of color are often blamed when Democrats lose.

 
 


Wednesday, November 3, 2021 12:02 AM

Del. Marcia “Cia” Price wins reelection bid for the 95th House District

Del. Marcia “Cia” Price won re-election Tuesday to a fourth term in the House of Delegates 95th District, beating Republican David G. Wilson. Price received 13,555 votes or roughly 63% ahead of Wilson who earned 7,760 votes or about 36% with 30 of 32 precincts reporting, unofficial results from the state Department of Elections showed as of 10:30 p.m... “We centered our campaign on the issues and really talking about my record for voting rights, housing, gun safety,” Price said. “The work we have done, the district asked me to do and I am really glad they are sending me back.”


Tuesday, November 2, 2021 6:37 PM

A look at the new laws that helped shape Virginia's 2021 elections

Assistance for certain voters, curbside voting

HB1921 expands curbside voting to any voter, regardless of age or physical ability, during a declared state of emergency.

Clarifies that any voter with a permanent physical disability, temporary physical disability, or injury is entitled to vote outside of the polling place.

According to the Department of Elections, curbside voting is "generally" only available for voters 65 years and older, or with a permanent disability.

The bill requires that the area designated for voting outside of the polling place be clearly marked and instructions on how the voter is to notify an officer of election of his request to vote outside of the polling place be prominently displayed.  

In what Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam called a "landmark" move, Gov. Northam this year approved the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, modeled after the Voting Rights Act of 1965. 

The bill protects against voter discrimination and intimidation and requires a public comment period over any election changes made at the local level.

Prohibits any voting qualification or any standard, practice, or procedure related to voting from being imposed or applied in a manner that results in the denial or abridgment of the right of any United States citizen to vote based on his race or color or membership in a language minority group.

According to Northam's office, Virginia became the first state in the south to enact its own Voting Rights Act, and was championed by State Senator Jennifer McClellan and Newport News Delegate Marcia Price.


Wednesday, October 20, 2021 6:29 PM

Fighting For You!

On Election Day, November 2nd, vote to protect our progress! I'm proud of the work we've done together to expand access to life-saving healthcare, support our students and teachers for better educational outcomes, bring good-paying jobs to the 95th District and the Commonwealth for working families, and more! Send me back to Richmond to keep fighting for YOU.


 


Saturday, October 2, 2021 9:25 AM

City Fest on Oct 3rd!

Don't forget City On My Chest is hosting #CityFest on Sunday, October 3rd from noon-6pm at Mill Point Park in Hampton! Follow them for more info on the amazing local talent and vendors they are highlighting at the event!


Thursday, September 30, 2021 6:01 PM

Like it should be (campaign update)

Did you see our new campaign video this week?

Our team released our second video focused on my fight to pass the historic Voting Rights Act of Virginia. I led the charge to pass this legislation because when we protect the rights of voters, we protect your voices on so many other issues.  We put in the hard work and made history.  Now, Virginia is one of the easiest states to be a voter. The way it should be. 
Watch our new video here:

 

While voting rights are under attack in other states, it's not happening here because of what Virginia Democrats accomplished.  When the bill was signed into law right here in Newport News, I felt so proud because we made history, together.

This is such an important time and leadership matters.  That is why I am running for reelection, so I can continue delivering results for the community that helped raise me. 

We have made important progress but we have more work to do to build a Virginia that works for all of us.  We must protect our progress and keep moving forward!

And you can help us do just that! 

Join our team and knock on doors, make phone calls, and donate


Tuesday, September 28, 2021 8:31 AM

Our latest ad dropped today! Let's protect voting rights!

Our vote is our voice and it's under attack. This is a crucial moment and leadership matters. That's why I led the charge to pass the historic Voting Rights Act of Virginia and why I am asking for your support so we can protect our progress.  Early voting is underway, now through October 30th! 
www.DelegateMarciaPrice.com 


Thursday, September 23, 2021 2:37 PM

Candidate Profile: Marcia “Cia” Price (District 95)

Marcia Price is the Democratic candidate for the Virginia House of Delegates District 95. Her name will appear on the ballot on Nov. 2.

Candidate: Marcia “Cia” Price

Race: Virginia House of Delegates District 95

 
Party: Democratic

Websitepricefordelegate.com

Biography: Del. Marcia “Cia” Price is a Democrat representing the 95th District in the Virginia House of Delegates. A 10th generation resident of Hampton Roads, Price is a lifelong advocate and public servant who is proud to represent the community who helped raise her. From passing the historic Voting Rights Act of Virginia, to protecting renters from unjust evictions and securing historic funding for education, Price has been a crucial voice for the residents of the 95th District in Richmond. She is currently running for re-election.

Why should Virginians re-elect you to the Virginia House of Delegates?

The people of the 95th District deserve a fighter; someone willing to stand up for them, and I’m proud to be that person. As a delegate, I’ve put all my effort into speaking up for those whose voices have been silenced by systemic obstacles, taking their concerns directly to Richmond, saying the things that need to be said, and doing the hard work of legislating to change lives.

The 757 is my home. I’m a 10th generation resident, and the people here helped raise me. That’s why I first ran, and why I’m running for re-election. We have delivered results on education, healthcare, voting rights, criminal justice reform, and more. But there’s so much left to do and I am up for the challenge to keep fighting until we build the Virginia that works for us all.

What do you hope to accomplish, if elected?

We listened to residents and did the work to deliver changes that the people of the 95th District deserve. This year alone, I led the charge to pass the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which protects fundamental freedoms that other states are now attacking. You can’t have a representative democracy when you’re actively cutting out communities from the democratic process.

I also fought and succeeded in providing crucial funding for communities to help prevent gun violence, protected renters from eviction during the pandemic, and secured historic funding for both K-12 and higher education. These advancements took hard work, dedication, collaboration, intense research, and negotiating skills that got results.  

If re-elected, I will continue strengthening our democracy and voting rights protections, reforming our criminal justice system, expanding access to affordable housing, stopping unfair evictions, bringing more good-paying jobs to the district, making healthcare more affordable, protecting our environment for future generations, working with others to prevent gun violence in our communities, and helping ensure our children can thrive and follow their dreams.

My record is all about fighting for people who need us most, and I’m proud of what we’ve accomplished together. If re-elected, I will continue to do the work to represent the 95th District well.

What is the most important issue facing your district, and what is your position on it?

Gun violence and its impact on our community remains a tragic reality for far too many in the 95th District. Understanding that gun violence is preventable, we have done a lot to address firearm safety, but we have to address the health, economic, education, and justice aspects of gun violence as well.

We must listen to our young people and provide them with opportunities to excel and pathways forward to success. We know what works and that’s where we are making strategic, long-term investments. This past Virginia General Assembly session, I helped secure $5.8 million for these kinds of evidence-based programs that will go directly to collaborations with community organizations in local communities like Newport News and Hampton. We must continue to work together to make sure our community is safe. Everyone can and should play a part.

What is your position on Virginia’s overall response to the coronavirus pandemic, and what might you have done differently?

I know that this has been a hard road since March 2020, and we have lost so many community members to this pandemic. The financial impact has also hit homes across the nation, but we are doing better than most states thanks to the leadership in the Virginia General Assembly and our governor. 

Our decisive, science-based, and collaborative decision making was key to getting the resources to those who need it, but we aren’t out of the woods yet. We cannot allow misinformation to harm our most vulnerable communities. We can recover quicker as a Commonwealth by understanding that our individual choices impact the whole of the community.  

We have already spent millions investing in free vaccinations, PPE, testing, contact tracing, rent relief, mortgage relief, utility relief, and investment in small businesses; however, more must be done at the state level to protect front-line workers and essential staff, especially those from black and brown communities, who are still disproportionately suffering due to lack of on-the-job support, threat of evictions, lack of access to the vaccine, and other issues that were only exacerbated by the pandemic. 

What are the top three issues created by the coronavirus pandemic in your district, and how would you plan to address them?

Amidst an ongoing global health crisis, people in the 95th District have also had to face the increased threat of evictions, lack of equitable access to healthcare, and continuing economic fallout. While these are issues that have worsened over the past two years, make no mistake: These are issues that residents of the 95th District have faced long before COVID-19.

The pandemic has only exacerbated existing inequities. That is why I have worked hard as a member of the Virginia House of Delegates to secure targeted investments back to the 95th District, including providing help to residents by injecting millions into the Unemployment Trust Fund, Rebuild VA (a special COVID-19 small business grant fund), and a variety of healthcare initiatives. We also took advantage of federal funding to address the eviction crisis, with more than $1 billion set aside for mortgage and rent relief. I’m proud of what I’ve been able to do to deliver on behalf of the people of the 95th District, but there is more to do, and if re-elected, more I will do.


Tuesday, September 21, 2021 4:45 PM

Local leaders react to school shooting at Heritage High in Newport News

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - A shooting took place at Heritage High School in Newport News Monday morning.

Two teens were shot: One male was shot in the side of the face, and the other was a female who was shot in the lower leg, police said, adding that neither sustained what are considered life-threatening injuries.

Police say a suspect is now in custody. He is a minor.

Local leaders are now reacting to the senseless act of violence that took place.

Del. Cia Price

What happened today is a tragedy. My heart goes out to the Heritage High School and Huntington Middle School students, families, teachers, and staff impacted; and to our whole community who are confronting yet another example of gun violence. Our young people deserve a safe learning environment where they can prepare for their future and thrive; not to have to fear yet another person with a gun. This cannot become the new normal.

It is so very important that we connect with these students and students all across our city and let them know that they are not alone, that we are supporting them, and that we are invested in their future. And we should encourage everyone to seek the mental health resources they need as we all process these events. Our community has proven time and time again how resilient we are, but we cannot and should not allow a community's strength to take the place of our collective responsibility to prevent gun violence.

I've been in touch with local leaders here, and we are on the same page: this cannot happen again, and we are committed to wrapping our services and our arms around these students.


Monday, September 20, 2021 4:34 PM

Price's statement on the Heritage High School Shooting

 

Del. Price's statement on today's events:

What happened today at Heritage High School is a tragedy. My heart goes out to the students, families, teachers, and staff impacted; and to our whole community who are confronting yet another example of gun violence. Our young people deserve a safe learning environment where they can prepare for their future and thrive; not to have to fear yet another person with a gun. This cannot become the new normal.

It is so very important that we connect with these students and students all across our city and let them know that they are not alone, that we are supporting them, and that we are invested in their future. And we should encourage everyone to seek the mental health resources they need as we all process the events.

Our community has proven time and time again how resilient we are, but we cannot and should not allow a community's strength to take the place of our collective responsibility to prevent gun violence. I've been in touch with local leaders here, and we are on the same page: this cannot happen again, and we are committed to wrapping our services and our arms around these students.


Friday, September 17, 2021 8:30 AM

Price Announces Twenty New Endorsements

As Early Voting Begins, Delegate Price Announces Twenty New Endorsements

"I am so proud to have earned the support of these organizations because, like me, they are dedicated to working and fighting on behalf of everyday people," Del. Price said. "During my time in the General Assembly, I have worked with them to deliver for the 95th District, to speak up for those voices that have been silenced, and to pass meaningful legislation that improves the lives of the people who call this community home. Today, as early voting kicks off across the Commonwealth, I am honored to have the backing of so many groups who know that I am the fighter my constituents need in Richmond."


Tuesday, September 7, 2021 8:06 AM

My Why

I'm running for reelection because I know what it takes to deliver for the people of the 95th District. So today, I'm asking for your support! On November 2, send me back to Richmond to keep fighting for you. Vote #TeamPrice! 
#BeTheChangeDoTheWork
Learn more: PriceForDelegate.com 
Donate: PriceForDelegate.com/contribute

 


Tuesday, August 31, 2021 6:36 PM

Northam Pardons 7 Men Executed in 1951

In front of the Civil Rights Memorial on Capitol Square on a humid day, Northam addressed reporters, sometimes almost drowned out by cicadas. “As we sit here in 2021 and think about what happened: the rapid trials, the trials by jurors that were all white men. It was wrong,” he said. “We're making progress, but still have a lot of work to do.” “Systemic racism exists in our society. Black oppression exists. And I think a lot of people need to step back and realize that Black oppression and racism didn't stop with slavery.”

Delegate Marcia Price of Newport News said the pardons gives energy to other advocacy on racial justice. “This was one of those opportunities to see wrongs get righted and it's really invigorating - it's powerful. But it's also inspiring for the work that is left for us to continue.”

Virginia outlawed the death penalty this year. 


Tuesday, August 31, 2021 3:42 PM

Black men executed for rape in 1951 granted posthumous pardons by Virginia governor

Tuesday’s announcement was welcome news to elected officials who had fought for such changes alongside Northam, including state Delegate Cia Price, D-Newport News. 

Price entered the Virginia Legislature a term before the 2017 blue wave election which saw the young official joined by other young, Black and brown progressive lawmakers in taking control of the previously Republican-controlled body. 

She pointed to Tuesday’s pardons as well as other reforms such as marijuana legalization and changes to civil rights laws over the last two years, as proof of the Democratic majority's priorities and successes. 

“Democrats have consistently been fighting for justice and I’m proud of the work we’ve done,” she said before stressing they are far from done. ”It’s going to take time, but days like today show that commitment.”

Northam also brought family members of the Martinsville Seven to the state Capitol for a private meeting where he signed the posthumous pardon document.


Friday, August 27, 2021 8:24 PM

As SCOTUS ends eviction freeze, lawmaker urges Virginians to seek $600M available in tenant relief

The White House's latest eviction ban is over. The Supreme Court ruled evictions can resume across the nation and claimed the CDC lacks the authority to impose a ban. However, Delegate Marcia Price (D-Newport News) said there are still hundreds of millions of dollars available for tenants in Virginia. “We do not want millions of dollars sitting in a pot just because people didn’t know about it," said Price.  Del. Price said it is "unfortunate" that the federal freeze ended, but Virginia has resources available for people struggling to keep a roof over their heads. As of mid-August, Price said roughly $655 million is still up for grabs through the Virginia Rent Relief Program. “The time is now. There is no more waiting," said Price.  

 


Saturday, August 21, 2021 1:39 PM

Despite eviction ban, Virginia families facing eviction; what experts say you should do

During the General Assembly’s special session, lawmakers approved a budget to extend state-level protections for those struggling to pay rent, mortgage and utility bills due to the pandemic. “[There's] about $655 million left in rent relief, so that’s what’s left for landlords and tenants to apply for,” Del. Marcia Price, who represents Virginia’s 95th District, said. There’s even funding available to help homeowners pay for their mortgage. “There’s also an additional $258 million in mortgage relief. We’re really trying to help people stay housed, especially during the pandemic. These funds are available for people to apply for now,” Del. Price said.

 

 
 


Friday, August 20, 2021 5:00 PM

Del. Price at The 19th News National Conference

PANEL

Voting rights: On the ground in Virginia | August 20, 2021 at 2:40 p.m. ET

Earlier this year, Virginia passed an expansive voting rights measure that restores many components of the federal Voting Rights Act, which had been stripped by the Supreme Court in 2013. The 19th’s Candice Norwood evaluates what those new rules mean for Virginia voters and how this state came to lead in the fight for voting rights.

  • State Del. Marcia “Cia” Price, Democrat, Virginia
  • Tram Nguyen, Co-Executive Director, New Virginia Majority

MODERATOR:

 Candice Norwood, Reporter, The 19th


Tuesday, August 17, 2021 3:48 PM

VA General Assembly Celebrates Warwick Little League

Warwick Little League major all-stars won the Virginia State Championship in July 2021! These 10-12-year-old athletes gave it their all and won bringing the Championship home to the Peninsula for the first time ever for their age group! Congratulations to them and the adults in their lives!

Read the Resolution here


Wednesday, August 4, 2021 6:06 PM

Eviction Moratorium Back in Place Across Most of the U.S.

For more information on how to apply for rent relief and housing resources, please visit: https://delegatemarciaprice.com/housing-information


Wednesday, August 4, 2021 11:24 AM

Va. Republicans look to end enhanced unemployment benefits, increase funding to prevent payroll tax hike

In a previous interview, Gov. Ralph Northam pledged that Virginians on unemployment could count on the $300 enhancement through the deadline set by Congress. “There are individuals in Virginia that are having difficulty finding employment and, until they do that, federal help is something that will help them pay their bills. So we don’t have any plans of eliminating that in Virginia,” Northam told 8News in June.

Del. Marcia Price (D-Newport News) agrees with that approach. Asked about this on Tuesday, she said, “The people I’m talking to in the 95th District absolutely want to work. They just don’t want to go back into dangerous work conditions.”

Price is among the lawmakers who backed a proposal from advocates to use ARPA funding to give bonuses to those experiencing long wait times for unemployment benefits in more complex cases. That does not appear to be included in the current spending plan that advanced out of committee on Monday, based on a budget briefing given to legislators.

 


Tuesday, August 3, 2021 4:51 PM

Virginia Eviction Protections Could Be Extended as Filings Rise

Right now, it’s optional for landlords to apply on behalf of tenants. Democratic lawmakers like Cia Price want to make it mandatory, as it was from late November through June. That setup won praise from the New York Times’ editorial board as a model for other states where the funds have languished.

“It is unconscionable that there would be evictions when the money is there,” Price said.

So far, the fund has helped over 48,000 households with over $300 million in rent money; nearly $700 million remains left to disperse. The budget proposed by Gov. Ralph Northam that is currently under consideration by the General Assembly would allow the program to be extended through June 2022 or until the funds are exhausted.


Tuesday, August 3, 2021 2:50 PM

Del. Price joins Democracy Nerd Podcast on Voting Rights

Bucking the trend of other states passing restrictive and repressive voter suppression laws in response to Trump's Big Lie, the commonwealth of Virginia is bucking this trend by passing its Voting Rights Act, with the novel idea that all citizens have the right to vote. What led to the first Southern state--and the first state previously covered by "preclearance" in the 1965 Voting Rights Act--to pass a bill expanding voting rights? Virginia State Sen. Jennifer McClelland and State Del. Cia Price join Jefferson to discuss the passage of the Virginia Voting Rights Act.


Tuesday, August 3, 2021 2:02 PM

Lawmakers Working to Iron Out Wrinkles in Eviction Protections

Delegate Cia Price is a Democrat from Newport News who says this is not the time to evict people who are having a hard time making ends meet. "This should not be used as an opportunity to get rid of anyone," explains Price. "Get your money, and then let's move forward."  (click for full story and audio)


Tuesday, August 3, 2021 12:04 AM

Virginia moves to restart eviction protections after federal moratorium lapses

Virginia was one of the first states to stand up a rent relief program, dedicating millions in federal aid to people unable to pay their bills. The program has been cited as a national model, but corresponding eviction protections that required landlords to notify tenants financial help was available and apply on their behalf ended in June, when Gov. Ralph Northam allowed the pandemic state of emergency to expire.

At the time, Northam’s administration stressed that the rent relief program still had millions of dollars available, money they believed landlords would tap into even in the absence of a mandate.

But as they gaveled into a special legislative session Monday, Virginia lawmakers said they believe a mandate is still necessary.

“What I think we are finding is that there are still quite a few landlords and tenants that do not know that the money is available,” said Del. Cia Price, D-Newport News. “So what we’re trying to do is make sure that if it’s mandated as part of the process, they’ll have to find out about it.”


Monday, August 2, 2021 11:40 AM

Lawmakers Working to Iron Out Wrinkles in Eviction Protections

Delegate Cia Price is a Democrat from Newport News who says this is not the time to evict people who are having a hard time making ends meet.  "This should not be used as an opportunity to get rid of anyone," explains Price. "Get your money, and then let's move forward."  Both the House and the Senate would need to agree on an exemption for small-scale landlords, so the fate of this proposal will play out as the special session progresses this week.


Friday, July 30, 2021 10:52 PM

With the eviction moratorium set to expire, here's how you can get rent relief money

"It’s really important for people to know this is not a loan. This is free money to pay your rent if you have had a negative impact because of COVID," Del. Marcia Price said.  To apply, there must be a loss of income due to the COVID-19 pandemic. People interested in applying for the Rent Relief Program can call 703-962-1884 to do so. "The program is set up where either the landlord or tenant can apply. You do not have to be going through an eviction at the moment to apply for it. Once it’s found that you’re eligible, the funds go to the landlord for the rent that’s due," Del. Price said.

 

 


Monday, July 26, 2021 11:45 AM

‘The long term fight’: How Democrats plan to save voting rights

Within the last two years, the state’s Democrat-controlled General Assembly and Governor Ralph Northam have secured no-excuse mail-in ballots, repealed a restrictive voter ID law, enacted automatic voter registration and made Election Day a state holiday – marking a radical expansion of voting rights that advocates now are fighting to protect, or risk undermining generational progress against a tide of suppressive voting laws across the US. “It can go away,” said the bill’s author, Virginia Representative Marcia Price. “I think people sometimes don’t really understand how fragile this process really is,” she told The Independent. “In my eyes, America’s democracy started in 1965 and not a day before that. What are we doing to protect it, feed it and nurture it? I think the next step is continuing to protect the progress that we’ve made and fighting back against the big lie.”

“It’s not blind faith or trust in humanity that got us the Voting Rights Act [of 1965],” she said. “It was literal blood, sweat and tears. … I don’t have the luxury to believe in the best in humanity. I need the laws to protect my rights, my community’s rights and everybody’s rights. I have hope in the people who have put their lives on the line because we’ve had to do that for generations to get the changes that we needed. That is what keeps us going.”

(Click to read more)


Friday, July 23, 2021 9:30 PM

Tenants urged to seek resources ahead of eviction moratorium's end on July 31

The nationwide eviction moratorium ends on July 31, and Del. Marcia Price says resources are available for people struggling with payments.  Advocates for tenants' rights advise people who are behind on their rent because of the pandemic should reach out for help as soon as possible.  This weekend, Price will host a seminar to help tenants know their rights, protections and help navigate through available resources. 

Price says people should know there are options.  “There’s a 14-day notice to pay or quit. There are payment plans. There's a 60-day stay for an eviction for a tenant and a 30-day stay for foreclosure for a homeowner,” she mentioned.  The "Know Your Rights: Housing Edition" event will take place Saturday, July 24, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Downing-Gross Cultural Arts Center at 2410 Wickham Avenue. It will also feature the City of Newport News, the Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia, Tidewater Tenants Rights, Consumer Litigation Associates, and the Virginia Poverty Law Center.  It will be live-streamed on Del. Marcia Price's Facebook page for people who are unable to attend.


Thursday, July 8, 2021 10:22 AM

Voting rights: What’s next after U.S. Supreme Court decision?

Earlier this year, the Virginia Voting Rights Act was championed in the Virginia General Assembly by state Sen. Jennifer McClellan of Richmond and Delegate Marcia Price of Newport News and signed into law by Gov. Ralph S. Northam. Passage of the Virginia Voting Rights Act initially was hailed as a secondary safeguard against new voter restrictions. But last week, this new legislation instantly became our life raft of last resort to protect our right to vote. As the national NAACP put in a statement, “The 6-3 ruling in Brnovich v. Democratic National Convention places new restrictions on Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act, which was signed into law almost 40 years ago by Ronald Reagan. The Court sent the clear message that vote suppressors around the country will go unchecked as they enact voting restrictions that disproportionately impact voters of color.” Since the Supreme Court’s ruling, I have been asked repeatedly, “What’s next?” and “Where do we go from here?” The easy answer would be that we need to pressure Congress to pass legislation like the John Lewis Voting Rights Act or similar reforms. However, here at the Virginia NAACP, we believe that now more than ever we must enshrine the right to vote in our state Constitution. We must work tirelessly to pass SJ272, championed by state Sen. Mamie Locke of Hampton.


Thursday, July 1, 2021 1:57 PM

Voting Rights Act goes into effect July 1

On July 1, 2021, Del. Price's bill, the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, became law to help protect our democracy in Virginia. This was a collaborative effort led by Del. Price with amazing partners Sen. Jennifer McClellan, New Virginia Majority, The Lawyer's Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, Advancement Project, and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.  It is modeled after the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965 and takes Virginia in a different direction by fighting voter suppression versus enabling it.  Click to read more about the bill, coverage on the bill, and updates on Voting Rights!


Thursday, July 1, 2021 10:24 AM

July 1st: New Laws Take Effect

Read more here: https://mailchi.mp/house/july-1-updates-new-laws


Wednesday, June 30, 2021 8:35 AM

New Virginia laws are going into effect Thursday. Here’s what you should know.

Here’s a non-comprehensive list of some of those bills, with information on how they could affect you or someone you know.

Voting rights

Under legislation introduced by Del. Marcia Price, D-Newport News, curbside voting will be extended to all voters during a state of emergency due to a public health crisis, such as the coronavirus pandemic. Previously, curbside voting was reserved for voters with a permanent or temporary physical disability. The new law requires the curbside voting area to be clearly marked, and instructions on how voters can notify election officials of their intent to vote outside will be provided on signs at the polling place.

(Click for full list)


Friday, June 25, 2021 2:13 PM

Virginia Expands Voting Rights as Other States Suppress Ballot Access

RICHMOND, Va.—On July 1, Virginia will implement eight more voting rights expansion measures backed by the House Democrats, making voting more accessible for all eligible voters to cast their ballots, which contrasts how Republicans nation-wide have advocated for voting restrictions. 

“As we’ve seen across the nation, in Republican-led state legislatures, they are repeating history and punishing Black and Brown voters for exercising their power. In Virginia, under our leadership, we know that our democracy is strongest when everyone can participate,” said Delegate Cia Price, the patron of HB 1980. “The Voting Rights Act of Virginia protects the rights of historically suppressed communities instead of attacking them.” 

Last year, when Virginia House of Delegates experienced its first Democratic majority in more than 20 years, House Democrats passed sweeping voting rights legislation including creating a permanent absentee vote-by-mail option, removing the excuse requirement for absentee voting, enacting same-day voter registration, establishing Election Day as a state holiday, expanding the voter identification law to include certain non-photo IDs, making voter registration applications available at high schools and colleges, authorizing automatic voter registration, and providing voting materials for non-English-speaking citizens in localities where a language minority group includes at least 10,000 voters or five percent of the voting population. 

(Click the link for more and for a list of new Voting Laws)


Wednesday, June 23, 2021 3:50 PM

Special Session II has been called!

It's official! The VA General Assembly is headed back to Richmond for Special Session II on Aug 2, 2021 to address the state budget, more specifically involving decisions around the federal relief funding coming to Virginia because of the American Rescue Plan.  Click here to read more and stay tuned on how to stay engaged through this process!

 


Wednesday, June 23, 2021 11:33 AM

Virginia’s marijuana reform needs work, some say. So a delegate and a defense lawyer will discuss the new law.

A Newport News state delegate and a prominent local criminal defense lawyer will talk about Virginia’s marijuana legalization on Wednesday evening in a Zoom call. The discussion — open to the public — is part of a new “Conversations with the Clerk” series sponsored by Newport News Clerk of Circuit Court Angela Reason. The online discussion between Reason, Del. Marcia “Cia” Price, D-Newport News, and attorney Timothy Clancy will begin at 6 p.m. Price was heavily involved in the recent effort to legalize marijuana, while Clancy is an expert on the current state laws on the issue.

The Zoom ID to get access to the discussion is 844-4057-6466. The Virginia General Assembly voted earlier this year to legalize the simple possession of marijuana for adults ages 21 and older. That’s up to an ounce, with no intent to distribute, and adults can grow up to four plants per household. But the law, which goes into effect July 1, is still considered confusing and a work in progress because it’s still against the law to both buy and sell pot. It’s also still illegal to use it in public or while driving. Lawmakers are still hashing out the details of how the marijuana marketplace will be formed and regulated.


Monday, June 21, 2021 9:31 AM

Juneteenth Recap & Updates

See Del. Price's newest email update on Juneteenth, rent relief, COVID-19 resources, and more!

https://mailchi.mp/house/juneteenth-and-updates


Thursday, June 17, 2021 8:06 AM

The Daily Podcast: June 17, 2021 Including Del. Price

Listen to hear more of the story from the June 14, 2021 article.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/17/podcasts/the-daily/ralph-northam.html


Monday, June 14, 2021 5:21 PM

Virginia state leaders, advocates answer questions about marijuana legalization

NORFOLK, Va. - In just a few weeks, simple possession of marijuana becomes legal in Virginia. Ahead of that, advocates and state leaders are seeking to help answer questions about what people can and cannot do.  The state has launched a website to help answer questions. Various advocacy groups also have made their own FAQ sections on their websites.

Adults 21 and older will be allowed to possess up to an ounce of marijuana.  "This was a good faith effort and a great first step to show that it's business and justice. We'll get through the gray area and we'll get to that structure being set up," said Del. Cia Price (D-Newport News). "This is the first step in a multi-year process as we work toward that 2024 deadline," said Price.

 


Monday, June 14, 2021 6:00 AM

Black Virginians Took Ralph Northam Back. Neither Has Forgotten.

Ms. Price, who represents heavily Black areas including Hampton and Newport News, said that when she returned to her district, it was clear to her that Black constituents were more divided on the scandal than the national outcry might suggest. Some wanted Mr. Northam to go, she said, but many were also so familiar with racism in the old Confederate South that they did not find his possible actions disqualifying. She also sensed opportunity. “With folks that have privilege, it is usually when that privilege is put into jeopardy, or called out, that the learning begins,” she said. “There were people calling me that have only spent a weekend at Virginia Beach, telling me what I should do for my constituents,” Ms. Price said. “But my lived experience shows me that I have to be strategic.” 

Wes Bellamy, a former vice mayor of Charlottesville and a Black activist who rallied behind Mr. Northam, said the governor’s message of personal growth was commendable, but should still be viewed through the lens of politics. That’s why he focuses on the impact of Mr. Northam’s policy, he said. “There are very few opportunities for Black people to demand what they want and truly believe the government is going to come through for them,” Mr. Bellamy said. “We knew we couldn’t just talk.”  Mr. Bellamy said Black political leaders saw another lesson. “A white person used their privilege to stay in office,” he said. But to make change, “Black people used their power.” Mr. Bellamy said. “We knew we couldn’t just talk.”

(Click to read the full article.)


Saturday, June 12, 2021 6:35 PM

Virginia unveils new marijuana legalization website; here’s what’s legal, and what isn’t starting July 1

Beginning July 1, Virginians over the age of 21 can legally possess up to an ounce of marijuana without fear of criminal or civil penalties. Virginia’s General Assembly passed legislation to legalize sales by the year 2024, and Gov. Ralph Northam soon after expedited the process to allow for legal possession before the year’s end. With the hopes of educating the public on what exactly to expect come July, the state launched a new resource tool to help citizens better understand the new law. “The fact there were multiple versions of the bill that came out, different stories and different aspects, people need to know what’s actually going into effect,” Del. Marcia Price told 13News Now Friday. Price was [a copatron] for the House of Delegates version of the marijuana legalization bill.

The new website, cannabis.virginia.gov, is an information hub to answer any questions civilians might have about what is or isn’t going into effect. It also outlines what aspects of the drug still need to be addressed in the coming years, and how people interested in getting in on the business-side of things can get involved.

Here’s what’s legal in just a few weeks:

  • Adults 21 years and older will be allowed to possess not more than one ounce of cannabis for personal use.
  • Generally, adults 21 years and older will be allowed to use marijuana in private residences. However, nothing prohibits the owner of a private residence from restricting the use of marijuana on its premises.
  • Adults 21 and over will also be allowed to grow up to four plants per household (not per person), according to specified requirements (see “Home Cultivation” below).
  • “Adult sharing” or transferring one ounce or less of marijuana between persons who are 21 years or older without remuneration will be legal. “Adult sharing” does not include instances in which (i) marijuana is given away contemporaneously with another reciprocal transaction between the same parties; (ii) a gift of marijuana is offered or advertised in conjunction with an offer for the sale of goods or services; or (iii) a gift of marijuana is contingent upon a separate reciprocal transaction for goods or services.

And here’s what’s still illegal:

  • It will remain illegal for anyone to possess more than one ounce of marijuana. Individuals found guilty of possessing more than one ounce, but not more than one pound of marijuana are subject to a civil penalty of not more than $25. Individuals found guilty of possessing more than one pound are subject to a felony.
  • It will remain illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to consume, purchase, or possess marijuana, or to attempt to consume, purchase or possess any amount of marijuana.
  • It will remain illegal to distribute or sell marijuana, and/or to possess any amount of marijuana with the intent to distribute or sell it. This prohibition applies equally to businesses, which will not be permitted to sell, “gift,” or in any other way distribute marijuana. For more information on how to obtain a license to sell marijuana in the future, see Adult-Use Cannabis Commercial Sales.
  • Existing safety measures will remain in place, including prohibiting use of marijuana while driving a motor vehicle or while being a passenger in a motor vehicle being driven; possessing marijuana on school grounds, while operating a school bus, in a motor vehicle transporting passengers for hire, or in a commercial vehicle.
 


Saturday, June 12, 2021 6:35 PM

Virginia unveils new marijuana legalization website; here’s what’s legal, and what isn’t starting July 1

Beginning July 1, Virginians over the age of 21 can legally possess up to an ounce of marijuana without fear of criminal or civil penalties. Virginia’s General Assembly passed legislation to legalize sales by the year 2024, and Gov. Ralph Northam soon after expedited the process to allow for legal possession before the year’s end. With the hopes of educating the public on what exactly to expect come July, the state launched a new resource tool to help citizens better understand the new law. “The fact there were multiple versions of the bill that came out, different stories and different aspects, people need to know what’s actually going into effect,” Del. Marcia Price told 13News Now Friday. Price was [a copatron] for the House of Delegates version of the marijuana legalization bill.

The new website, cannabis.virginia.gov, is an information hub to answer any questions civilians might have about what is or isn’t going into effect. It also outlines what aspects of the drug still need to be addressed in the coming years, and how people interested in getting in on the business-side of things can get involved.

Here’s what’s legal in just a few weeks:

  • Adults 21 years and older will be allowed to possess not more than one ounce of cannabis for personal use.
  • Generally, adults 21 years and older will be allowed to use marijuana in private residences. However, nothing prohibits the owner of a private residence from restricting the use of marijuana on its premises.
  • Adults 21 and over will also be allowed to grow up to four plants per household (not per person), according to specified requirements (see “Home Cultivation” below).
  • “Adult sharing” or transferring one ounce or less of marijuana between persons who are 21 years or older without remuneration will be legal. “Adult sharing” does not include instances in which (i) marijuana is given away contemporaneously with another reciprocal transaction between the same parties; (ii) a gift of marijuana is offered or advertised in conjunction with an offer for the sale of goods or services; or (iii) a gift of marijuana is contingent upon a separate reciprocal transaction for goods or services.

And here’s what’s still illegal:

  • It will remain illegal for anyone to possess more than one ounce of marijuana. Individuals found guilty of possessing more than one ounce, but not more than one pound of marijuana are subject to a civil penalty of not more than $25. Individuals found guilty of possessing more than one pound are subject to a felony.
  • It will remain illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to consume, purchase, or possess marijuana, or to attempt to consume, purchase or possess any amount of marijuana.
  • It will remain illegal to distribute or sell marijuana, and/or to possess any amount of marijuana with the intent to distribute or sell it. This prohibition applies equally to businesses, which will not be permitted to sell, “gift,” or in any other way distribute marijuana. For more information on how to obtain a license to sell marijuana in the future, see Adult-Use Cannabis Commercial Sales.
  • Existing safety measures will remain in place, including prohibiting use of marijuana while driving a motor vehicle or while being a passenger in a motor vehicle being driven; possessing marijuana on school grounds, while operating a school bus, in a motor vehicle transporting passengers for hire, or in a commercial vehicle.
 


Monday, June 7, 2021 11:59 PM

Hampton's first Black police chief shares vision, strategy for division

Participants, including Congressman Bobby Scott and Del. Marcia Price, asked about Talbot's views on policing. “I believe in saving lives and I want to save as many lives as possible," he said. Talbot said he prioritizes community engagement and opposes "broken windows" policing, which focuses on low-level offenses to ward off serious crimes.  He argued police should not focus on arresting people for minor offenses without known danger.  Talbot is coming from Norristown, Pennsylvania, where the town says violent crime fell more than 50 percent in three years, and overall serious crimes fell 44 percent.  "My strategy will work and Hampton will be safer," he said.  When asked if he supports citizen review boards or the end to qualified immunity, Talbot did not oppose either.  “If that’s what the City of Hampton wants to do, it will not stop what we are doing as a police department,” he said.  Talbot offered his opinion on criminal justice reform, saying policing cannot be addressed without also tackling everyday issues that cause disparities.  “I want everyone who gets pulled over by police officers I want you to be to treated like the police chief," said Talbot. Talbot said he supports recommendations made in the 21st Century Task Force on policing, which included citizen review boards. Talbot starts July 6.


Sunday, May 16, 2021 1:13 PM

As GOP restricts voting, Democrats move to expand access

Last year, for the first time in more than a quarter-century, Democrats in Virginia took control of the statehouse and the governor’s mansion. Since then, one priority has become clear: expanding voting rights. Once home to the capital of the Confederacy, Virginia has made Election Day a state holiday, repealed a voter identification law and allowed no-excuse absentee voting. Earlier this year, Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam approved a sweeping voting rights act, reinstating election rules once required by federal law to prevent racial discrimination.

"It was kind of surreal to know that we had the power to change something in 2021 that we had been working on for my entire lifetime,” said Del. Marcia Price, a Virginia Democrat who sponsored the Voting Rights Act of Virginia. “I think the contrast is becoming so clear of what democracy looks like and what impeding democracy looks like.”


Friday, April 30, 2021 10:35 AM

Del. Price's update on Maternal Health

In 2018, both Serena Williams and Beyonce opened up about their birth stories and went public with issues they encountered.  Their courage raised the issue for Del. Lashrecse Aird and me and we started speaking with family members and constituents and found so many people retelling similar stories of loss and close-to-death experiences.  Some stories were spoken aloud for the first time, but each revealed systemic and structural failings that Del. Aird and I knew we had to work to fix.  In late 2018 and early 2019, we spoke up about the concerns and we were met with condescension, resistance, and ignorance.  When we quoted the statistics of Black women’s maternal mortality, especially in our own districts, people thought we were exaggerating.  But that did not deter us.  We continued to speak up and fight for our constituents and pregnant people around the Commonwealth and it was a siren to advocates, experts, practitioners, parents, patients, and those who were mourning their lost loved ones.  We showed them we were listening, that they mattered, and that they had us as entrances into an often-daunting system.  We let them know that they are our priority.  (Click above for the full update)


Tuesday, April 20, 2021 9:49 PM

Virginia's Democratic leaders hail verdict, but say work against injustice must continue

Democratic political leaders in Virginia on Tuesday said the guilty verdict against Derek Chauvin in the murder of George Floyd heralds a new standard for police officers in their treatment of Black people but leaves an incomplete effort to extricate racism from the justice system.

Floyd’s death under Chauvin’s knee in Minnesota last May inflamed months of protests in Richmond over police brutality and systemic racism in the criminal justice system — prompting a still-ongoing reckoning among policymakers that has yielded some state reforms.

“The work continues, but it’s also OK to enjoy a well-needed exhale, even if only for a moment,” said Del. Cia Price, D-Newport News, reacting to the guilty verdict on Twitter.

 

The Virginia Legislative Black Caucus in a collective statement described the road to the guilty verdict as an “incredibly painful and emotional time” that in the end yielded some relief.

“We cannot stop here,” the 23-member caucus said. “While this verdict serves as a step forward in combating systemic racism, the work continues to ensure that the arc of the moral universe bends towards justice both for our children and for the generations after them.”


Monday, April 19, 2021 12:23 PM

Del. Cia Price endorses Del. Sam Rasoul for lieutenant governor

“Sam is a man of integrity that has demonstrated a better side of politics. By focusing on people and policy, Sam truly has been a voice of courage and conviction in the General Assembly,” said Price. “He has put in the work and would do an amazing job in higher office. His leadership, character, and vision are what we need in our next lieutenant governor.”

“Del. Price’s vision and tenacity have earned the respect of her colleagues, the trust of her constituents, and the admiration of people across Virginia and beyond,” said Rasoul. “I’m exceedingly lucky to call her a friend and enjoyed working with her in the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus. I look forward to continuing that work together as lieutenant governor.”


Saturday, April 10, 2021 12:00 AM

Editorial: Virginia leading the way on voting rights

The commonwealth has amended its franchise — the new “Voting Rights Act of Virginia” is now on the books — and the national press has taken notice. “Virginia, the Old Confederacy’s Heart, Becomes a Voting Rights Bastion,” ran the April 2 headline in The New York Times. The paper’s website account came complete with a very nice and well justified picture of Del. Marcia Price, a Peninsula Democrat and the legislation’s House sponsor. Sen. Jennifer McClellan, D-Richmond, carried the bill in the upper chamber. “I have an aunt who marched against the poll tax. My grandparents both had to pay poll taxes,” Del. Price told the paper. “Just knowing that they lived under a system that was unfair and unequal, I learned very early that it was wrong, and that it needs to be changed.”


Monday, April 5, 2021 12:31 PM

Virginia, the Old Confederacy’s Heart, Becomes a Voting Rights Bastion

The new law that was approved on Wednesday, called the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, requires all local elections administrators to receive public feedback or advance approval from the state’s attorney general for changes like moving voting precincts or elections registrars’ offices, and allows voters and the attorney general to sue over voter suppression. It expressly prohibits any racial discrimination or intimidation related to voting. “I have an aunt who marched against the poll tax. My grandparents both had to pay poll taxes,” said Marcia Price, a Democratic state delegate who sponsored the legislation. “Just knowing that they lived under a system that was unfair and unequal, I learned very early that it was wrong, and that it needs to be changed.”


Sunday, April 4, 2021 12:36 PM

Opinion: Distinguished pols of the week: Virginia lawmakers get it right on voting rights

Consider Virginia, where Gov. Ralph Northam (D) on Wednesday approved the nation’s first state-level voting rights act. The Post reports: “The measure prohibits localities from changing the location of a polling place without getting clearance in advance or from enacting any policy that restricts access to voting based on someone’s race or language.” Virginia lawmakers, in other words, are not waiting for Congress to reconstitute the Voting Rights Act (which the Supreme Court gutted in a 2013 case). “Sponsored by Sen. Jennifer L. McClellan (D-Richmond) and Del. Marcia S. ‘Cia’ Price (D-Newport News), the act puts into state law components of the federal Voting Rights Act. Virginia was among a handful of states with a history of racial discrimination in voting that had been subject to federal review under the provisions of the act.”

Northam and the Democratic legislation have made Virginia into a “bastion” of voting rights reform, the New York Times reports: “In the last 14 months, the state’s Democratic-controlled General Assembly and Mr. Northam have together repealed the state’s voter ID law, enacted 45 days of no-excuse absentee voting, made Election Day a state holiday and enacted automatic voter registration for anyone who receives a Virginia driver’s license.” These moves build on the work of former Democratic governor and current gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, who restored voting rights to more than 200,000 ex-felons in the state while has was in office.


Thursday, April 1, 2021 4:40 PM

VIDEO: Virginia Leaders Discuss Voting Rights, Virginia’s Progress, and the Stakes of the 2021 Elections

Richmond, VA — Today, Virginia Democrats and leaders on the front lines of the fight to protect voting rights held a video press conference to discuss the significant progress Virginia has made on voting rights over the last two years and what is at stake in the face of rising GOP extremism.

Delegate Cia Price:

“The act of voting is freedom. It’s power. And that’s why it has been weaponized against us since the franchise of voting began — and that’s why we have worked so hard on expanding access to the ballot…Voter suppression has been targeted against those who were already disenfranchised by systemic racism, and it has impacted who has been elected and how they built power…Our values are based in the simple fact that the more people who can participate, the stronger our democracy.”

 

 


Thursday, April 1, 2021 12:38 PM

Northam supports Virginia Voting Rights Act, paid sick leave for home health workers and host of other measures at deadline for action

RICHMOND — Gov. Ralph Northam has given preliminary approval to a Voting Rights Act that would make Virginia one of the first states in the country to enshrine protections against efforts to restrict access to polling places at a time when other states are considering limits on the ability to vote.

After two years of consolidated control of state government, Democrats have remade Virginia’s public policy landscape, which had been dominated by Republican legislatures for a generation. This year the General Assembly voted to abolish the death penalty, which Northam signed into law, and legalize marijuana, which Northam has proposed amending to speed up the legalization of small amounts for personal use.

The General Assembly will take up amendments proposed by Northam during a one-day reconvened session April 7.

The bills he signed into law Wednesday, all of which will take effect July 1, included:

●A ban on firearms within 40 feet of a polling place or a meeting of the electoral board as it certifies the results of an election.

●A “ban the box” bill for public colleges and universities, preventing them from asking an applicant about criminal records during the admissions process or denying admission based on criminal history.

●Requiring employers to provide paid sick leave for home health-care workers who are hired through Medicaid.

●Expanding the Virginia Court of Appeals to 17 judges from 11 and establishing a right of repeal in all civil cases.

●Extending through July 1, 2022, a moratorium on evictions for renters who are suffering financial hardship because of the coronavirus pandemic.

●Eliminating the “gay/trans panic” defense in murder and assault cases, meaning that a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity cannot, on its own or in concert with a sexual advance, be considered justification for violence.


Wednesday, March 31, 2021 8:39 PM

Virginia’s governor announces his support for a sweeping voting rights bill.

Virginia’s bill protecting and expanding access to voting comes at a time when Republican legislatures across the country have been seeking to erect new barriers to the ballot box. Georgia passed a law last week overhauling the state’s election process with a host of new restrictions, and Texas, Arizona, Florida and other states are continuing efforts to pass similar bills. Mr. Northam, a Democrat, said that he made minor technical adjustments to the bill, which was sponsored by Senator Jennifer McClellan and Delegate Marcia Price, two Black lawmakers who are also Democrats. It is expected to be ratified by the state legislature when they reconvene on April 7 for final passage.


Wednesday, March 31, 2021 8:02 PM

Governor Northam Approves Voting Rights Act of Virginia

The Voting Rights Act of Virginia prohibits discrimination in elections administration, requires local election officials to get feedback or pre-approval for voting changes, and allows individuals to sue in cases of voter suppression. It requires localities seek public comment or pre-approval from the Office of the Attorney General on any proposed voting changes, and empowers voters and/or the Attorney General to sue in cases of voter suppression. Civil penalties awarded as a result of voting discrimination will go towards a newly-established Voter Education and Outreach Fund.  Additionally, the Voting Rights Act of Virginia prohibits at-large local elections if they dilute the voting power of racial minorities. It also ensures accessibility by requiring local election officials provide voting materials in foreign languages, as needed. The Governor’s minor technical amendments clarify that certain provisions apply to all localities not just “covered jurisdiction(s).”

“Virginia is standing strong against a coordinated and intentional effort to restrict voting rights across the nation,” said Delegate Cia Price. “These targeted restrictions are designed to disenfranchise people of color, working Americans, and non-native English speakers. With this bill, our Commonwealth is taking the opposite approach and we are making a bold statement against voter suppression. We are upholding the dignity, voice, and vote of all Virginians.”


Wednesday, March 31, 2021 8:00 PM

Governor signs Voting Rights Act of Virginia

Advocates on Wednesday hailed the passage of Virginia’s new suite of voter protections. In addition to giving the state attorney general preclearance authority, the new law also increases individual voters' power to mount legal challenges. "The Voting Rights Act of Virginia shows just how far a state with roots from the darkest days of racism in this country can come, and will be a model for the entire nation,” said Marcia Johnson-Blanco of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. “This legislation stands in stark contrast to the regressive bills that have been adopted and proposed in other states that will make it more difficult for people to vote."

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Del. Price was the sponsor of HB1890, the Voting Rights Act of Virginia.


Wednesday, March 31, 2021 1:06 PM

Gov. Northam proposes moving up legalization of marijuana in Virginia to July 1

RICHMOND, Va. — Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam has proposed several amendments to the marijuana bill, including one that would legalize simple possession this July 1.  The changes would move up legalization three years sooner than previously planned, according to a news release from the governor's office. The bill now goes back to the General Assembly for approval.  At the moment, the already-passed legislation doesn't legalize possession until 2024, the same year cannabis sales would be allowed in the Commonwealth. This became a point of contention among some Democratic lawmakers earlier in 2021, who feared that prolonging possession for several years would be putting "business before justice," as Del. Marcia Price told 13News Now earlier this March.  “It’s not a matter of being happy or sad: it’s just the responsible thing to do in light of the fact that the people being harmed the most are the people who will continue to be harmed the most," Del. Don Scott Jr. (D-Portsmouth) told 13News Now.


Wednesday, March 31, 2021 12:41 PM

Northam acts on final pieces of legislation from special session

“Throughout this session, we have focused on responding to the ongoing public health and economic impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic and moving our Commonwealth forward,” he said. “These new laws will increase support for Virginia families and businesses, ensure our children and teachers can safely return to classrooms, advance equity, and tackle systemic racism. I am extremely proud of the meaningful progress we have made to enact legislation as unprecedented as the challenges we are facing.”

 

Some of the bills that Northam took action on are listed below:

 
  • House Bill 1889, sponsored by Delegate Marcia Price, extends eviction protections for renters experiencing financial hardship due to the pandemic through July 1, 2022. 
  • House Bill 1930, sponsored by Delegate Lashrecse Aird, prohibits public institutions of higher education from asking about an individuals’ criminal record during the application process. The new law also prohibits colleges and universities from denying admission based on criminal history.
  • House Bill 1980, sponsored by Delegate David Reid, establishes the “Enslaved Ancestors College Access Scholarship and Memorial Program” to support the families of enslaved individuals who labored at Virginia colleges. 
  • House Bill 2081, sponsored by Delegate Mark Levine, prohibits the possession of firearms within 40 feet of a polling place or electoral board meeting to certify the results of an election.
  • House Bill 2075, sponsored by Delegate Joshua Cole, designates U.S. Route 1 as “Emancipation Highway.” Route 1 is currently named “Jefferson Davis Highway” in several parts of Virginia.
  • House Bill 2132, sponsored by Delegate Danica Roem, eliminates the outdated and discriminatory “gay panic” defense.
  • House Bill 2137, sponsored by Delegate Elizabeth Guzman, requires employers to provide paid sick leave to home health workers. This new law also prohibits employers from taking certain retaliatory actions against employees who use leave.
  • House Bill 2161, sponsored by Delegate Kathy Tran, and Senate Bill 1410, sponsored by Senator John Bell, prohibits discrimination in public accommodations, employment, and housing on the basis of a person’s military status.
  • House Bill 2332, sponsored by Delegate Mark Sickles, establishes the Commonwealth Health Reinsurance Program to expand access to health care and lower insurance premiums.
  • Senate Bill 1122, sponsored by Senator Bill Stanley, repeals the remaining provisions of the Habitual Offender Act. This will allow more than 13,000 people to obtain driver’s licenses.
  • Senate Bill 1138, sponsored by Senator Mamie Locke, updates several outdated criminal laws related to people living with HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. The reforms reflect contemporary public health knowledge and help to de-stigmatize these diseases.
  • Senate Bill 1261, sponsored by Senator John Edwards, provides for an appeal of right in every civil case and expands the Virginia Court of Appeals from 11 to 17 judges.
  • Senate Bill 1303, sponsored by Senator Siobhan Dunnavant, requires school divisions offer in-person learning consistent with public health guidelines, in accordance with the constitutional authority of school divisions, and while prioritizing the safety of students, teachers, and staff. All of Virginia’s 132 school divisions are currently offering in-person learning options or have approved plans to do so.
  • Senate Bill 1310, sponsored by Senator Jennifer McClellan, House Bill 2032, sponsored by Delegate Wendy Gooditis, and House Bill 1864, sponsored by Delegate Marcia Price, ensure that domestic workers are covered by employee protections, fair pay laws, and the Virginia Human Rights Act.


Wednesday, March 24, 2021 1:07 PM

Brain Injury Awareness Rally

Thank you Brain Injury Association of VirginiaThe Denbigh House, Clubhouse for Survivors of Brain Injury, and others for hosting such a WONDERFUL rally for #BrainInjuryAwareness Month! It was an honor to stand with everyone and offer a few words! Video from the rally can be seen here to hear AMAZING stories from ambassadors.  And you can sign up to become an ambassador here: https://www.biav.net/be-an-ambassador-2/

 

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